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Colloquium on: The Concept of Friendship in Ancient Greek Philosophy, Early Christianity and Judaism

Colloquium on: The Concept of Friendship in Ancient Greek Philosophy, Early Christianity and Judaism

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Date and Time
Date(s) - 05/06/2014
6:30 pm - 8:00 pm




Martin Buber on Friendship

 

For the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber (1878-1965) genuine friendship is secured and sustained by the bonds of mutual trust, which are forged by what he called dialogue. As the framework in which trust is established between individuals, dialogue demands that we are open – attentively and empathetically respectful – to the existential and spiritual reality of the other and pari passu allow, indeed, invite the other to appreciate our inner reality with all our pain, fears, hopes, creative eros, and sources of joy.

 

Paul Mendes-Flohr is Professor of Modern Jewish Thought in the Divinity School, an associate member of the Department of History at the University of Chicago and Professor emeritus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He serves also as co-editor-in-chief of the collected works of Martin Buber (in German). His major research interests include modern Jewish intellectual history, modern Jewish philosophy and religious thought, philosophy of religion, German intellectual history, and the history and sociology of intellectuals.

 

Panel Discussion chaired by Nikos Stavroulakis to follow.